Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer’s Day

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature’s changing course untrimmed.

But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
Nor shall death brag thou wand’rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st.

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Sonnet 18 – William Shakespeare

Rush Limbaugh’s ‘Straight Shooter’ Tucson Billboard Is Removed

AOL News – By Elliot Olshansky

Even gun metaphors need a rest now and again.

In the wake of the Tucson, Ariz., shooting at an event hosted by Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, talk radio host Rush Limbaugh has been emphatic in his assertion that he and other right-wing political figures in no way contributed to the mindset of suspected gunman Jared Loughner. But an unfortunate billboard advertising Limbaugh’s show has given his critics some ammunition of their own.

A photograph was circulated early this morning of the Tucson billboard, which was located along Interstate 10, just five miles from the Safeway store where a gunman killed six people and injured 13 others, including Giffords.

The text of the ad read “Rush Limbaugh Straight Shooter,” and was accompanied by pictures of stray bullet holes.

The New York-based blogger “copyranter,” who describes himself as an advertising copywriter with 18 years experience, posted the picture from Reddit on his site, noting that the billboard had “actually been there for quite some time” and that it was created by KNST, the Tucson station on which Limbaugh’s program airs.

When contacted by Surge Desk, the man who originally posted the photo to Reddit said that the billboard was taken down on Monday, two days after the shooting rampage.

With debate raging in the country over whether incendiary rhetoric actually leads to violent acts, the discovery of the billboard suddenly took on new meaning, and many people took to Twitter and blogs to express their displeasure.

Gay slur in lyrics disqualifies Dire Straits hit from Canadian radio play

The Canadian Press

The 1980s song Money for Nothing by the British rock band Dire Straits has been deemed unacceptable for play on Canadian radio.

In a ruling released Wednesday, the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council says the song contravenes the human rights clauses of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters’ Code of Ethics and Equitable Portrayal Code.

A listener to radio station CHOZ-FM in St. John’s complained last year that the song includes the word “faggot” in its lyrics and is discriminatory to gays.

The broadcaster argued that the song had been played countless times since its release decades ago and has won music industry awards.

A CBSC panel concluded that the word “faggot,” even if once acceptable, has evolved to become unacceptable in most circumstances.

The panel noted that Money for Nothing would be acceptable for broadcast if suitably edited.

Judge rules inmate ‘bitten on penis by rodent’ may sue

BBC

A New York man who says a rat bit his penis during a jail stay may sue county officials, a judge has ruled.

Peter Solomon, who said he later had to endure a course of rabies jabs, says jailers knew the ward in which they placed him was infested with rodents.

He says the jail was negligent and mistreated him because he is black.

Lawyers for Nassau County sought to have the suit dismissed. Among other arguments, its experts said they saw no evidence of serious injury.

Rodent problem disputed

In February 2007, Mr Solomon, a Vietnam veteran who says he has been treated for post-traumatic stress disorder, was jailed in the Nassau County Correctional Center near New York City, pending trial on charges he had menaced his wife.

He was transferred to a medical observation unit amid worries he was mentally ill. In court documents obtained by the BBC, he claims at night a rat “or similar rodent” emerged from a hole in his mattress and bit him on the penis and hand, drawing blood.

Mr Solomon, 54, claimed the county was indifferent to his treatment and failed to protect him from the vermin, and sued for damages.

County officials said they were shielded from lawsuits because they had acted in an official capacity, they were unaware of substantial risks, and they disputed the notion that a rodent problem existed in the jail.

They also noted the wound did not require stitching and argued that his injuries were merely psychological.

“The parties dispute whether the rodent was a mouse or a rat, whether Solomon was bitten or scratched, and the nature and extent of his injuries,” US District Judge Arthur Spatt wrote.

He ruled on Thursday the suit may proceed.

Silvia Hartmann’s Project Sanctuary

The sun rises two days early in Greenland, sparking fears that climate change is accelerating

By Daily Mail Reporter

The sun over Greenland has risen two days early, baffling scientists and sparking fears that Arctic icecaps are melting faster than previously thought.

Experts say the sun should have risen over the Arctic nation’s most westerly town, Ilulissat, yesterday, ending a month-and-a-half of winter darkness.

But for the first time in history light began creeping over the horizon at around 1pm on Tuesday – 48 hours ahead of the usual date of 13 January.

The mysterious sunrise has confused scientists, although it is believed the most likely explanation is that it is down to the lower height of melting icecaps allowing the sun’s light to penetrate through earlier.

Thomas Posch, of the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Vienna, said that a local change of the horizon was ‘by far the most obvious explanation’.

He said as the ice sinks, so to does the horizon, creating the illusion that the sun has risen early.

This theory, based on the gradual decline of Greenland’s ice sheet, is backed by recent climate studies.

A report by the World Meteorology Organisation shows that temperatures in Greenland have risen around 3C above average over the last year.

It also reported that December was much warmer than usual with rainfall instead of snow recorded for the first time in Kuujjuaq since records began.

It has even been suggested that the sun’s early appearance could have an astronomical explanation.

But Wolfgang Lenhardt, director of the department of geophysics at the Central Institute for Meteorology in Vienna, scotched this theory.

He said: ‘The constellation of the stars has not changed. If that had happened, there would have been an outcry around the world.

‘The data of the Earth’s axis and Earth’s rotation are monitored continuously and meticulously and we would know if that had happened.’

Horizon calculator – radar / visual

A mirage is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which light rays are bent to produce a displaced image of distant objects or the sky. The word comes to English via the French mirage, from the Latin mirare, meaning “to look at, to wonder at”. This is the same root as for “mirror” and “to admire”. Also, it has its roots in the Arabic mirage.

In contrast to a hallucination, a mirage is a real optical phenomenon which can be captured on camera, since light rays actually are refracted to form the false image at the observer’s location. What the image appears to represent, however, is determined by the interpretive faculties of the human mind. For example, inferior images on land are very easily mistaken for the reflections from a small body of water.

Mirages can be categorized as “inferior” (meaning lower), “superior” (meaning higher) and “Fata Morgana“, one kind of superior mirage consisting of a series of unusually elaborate, vertically-stacked images, which form one rapidly-changing mirage.

The word metaphor derives from the 16th century Old French métaphore, in turn from the Latin metaphora “carrying over”, which is the romanization of the Greek μεταφορά (metaphorá), “transfer”, from μεταφέρω (metaphero), “to carry over”, “to transfer”, itself a compound of μετά (meta), “between” + φέρω (pherō), “to bear”, “to carry”.

end – 😉

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