“The deal that was reached tonight is a disappointment for me and for millions of Americans who expected $100 billion in cuts, who wanted to make sure their tax dollars stopped flowing to the nation’s largest abortion provider, and who wanted us to defund ObamaCare,” Bachmann said in a statement.”

Paul voted against the short-term resolution that will give negotiators time to hash out the larger deal. “As I have said before,” he said in a statement, “there is not much of a difference between a $1.5 trillion deficit and a $1.6 trillion deficit – both will lead us to a debt crisis that we may not recover from.” Source:  Politico

It is the duty of every Republican Congressman to vote no on this terrible deal. It violates our campaign promises to the American people. We promised $100 billion of cuts and we delivered $38 billion ($62 billion on a twelve month basis). In the Republican House’s first real test out of the box it has broken the promise over which it was elected. Only in Meat Loaf’s music is “two out of three not bad.” Dick Morris

Government shutdown averted

Politico – By: David Rogers

The bottom line to Friday night’s spending deal is a record $40 billion cut in domestic and foreign aid appropriations – and a hard lesson in the tough and almost permanent disorder of Washington’s budget politics.

This weekend, the grind goes on with House and Senate Appropriations Committee clerks now doing the hard work of making the pieces actually fit in the new top line, just under $1.050 trillion. And having played hard-to-get, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) becomes the suitor, having to sell the deal to his young and restless Republican Conference before a floor vote next week.

Racing the clock in a long, dizzying long day of trading offers, Boehner and President Barack Obama only reached agreement hours before what would have been an unprecedented wartime shutdown of the government that threatened both men. Down to the end, Boehner was still pressing for a lower top line when Obama called him in the early evening. And the deal was only sealed in the midst of the speaker making his own presentation to fellow Republicans during a closed door party caucus.

Both men later cast the agreement as the best available, but the grueling, often distrustful process testified to how tough this legislative year will be and the immense pressure on Boehner from the right.

The administration largely succeeded in blocking the most controversial policy riders impacting the environment and abortion-rights. But the spending cut is one of the single largest in history, and a preview of what lies ahead when Republicans move their 2012 budget plan next week and fight with Obama over raising the debt ceiling in May and June.

“Like any worthwhile compromise, both sides had to make tough decisions and give ground on issues that were important to them,” Obama said. “And I certainly did that.”

“We didn’t do it at this late hour for drama,” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), the third major player in the talks, “We did it because it has been hard to arrive at this point.”…]

President Obama’s Statement on the Bipartisan Agreement on the Budget

White House Blog – Posted by Macon Phillips

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT ON THE BUDGET

11:04 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Good evening.  Behind me, through the window, you can see the Washington Monument, visited each year by hundreds of thousands from around the world.  The people who travel here come to learn about our history and to be inspired by the example of our democracy — a place where citizens of different backgrounds and beliefs can still come together as one nation.

Tomorrow, I’m pleased to announce that the Washington Monument, as well as the entire federal government, will be open for business.  And that’s because today Americans of different beliefs came together again.

In the final hours before our government would have been forced to shut down, leaders in both parties reached an agreement that will allow our small businesses to get the loans they need, our families to get the mortgages they applied for, and hundreds of thousands of Americans to show up at work and take home their paychecks on time, including our brave men and women in uniform.

This agreement between Democrats and Republicans, on behalf of all Americans, is on a budget that invests in our future while making the largest annual spending cut in our history.  Like any worthwhile compromise, both sides had to make tough decisions and give ground on issues that were important to them.  And I certainly did that.

Some of the cuts we agreed to will be painful. Programs people rely on will be cut back.  Needed infrastructure projects will be delayed.  And I would not have made these cuts in better circumstances.

But beginning to live within our means is the only way to protect those investments that will help America compete for new jobs — investments in our kids’ education and student loans; in clean energy and life-saving medical research.  We protected the investments we need to win the future.

At the same time, we also made sure that at the end of the day, this was a debate about spending cuts, not social issues like women’s health and the protection of our air and water.  These are important issues that deserve discussion, just not during a debate about our budget.

I want to think Speaker Boehner and Senator Reid for their leadership and their dedication during this process.  A few months ago, I was able to sign a tax cut for American families because both parties worked through their differences and found common ground.  Now the same cooperation will make possible the biggest annual spending cut in history, and it’s my sincere hope that we can continue to come together as we face the many difficult challenges that lie ahead, from creating jobs and growing our economy to educating our children and reducing our deficit.  That’s what the American people expect us to do.  That’s why they sent us here.

A few days ago, I received a letter from a mother in Longmont, Colorado.  Over the year, her son’s eighth grade class saved up money and worked on projects so that next week they could take a class trip to Washington, D.C.  They even have an appointment to lay a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

The mother wrote that for the last few days the kids in her son’s class had been worried and upset that they might have to cancel their trip because of a shutdown.  She asked those of us in Washington to get past our petty grievances and make things right.  And she said, “Remember, the future of this country is not for us.  It’s for our children.”

Today we acted on behalf of our children’s future.  And next week, when 50 eighth graders from Colorado arrive in our nation’s capital, I hope they get a chance to look up at the Washington Monument and feel the sense of pride and possibility that defines America — a land of many that has always found a way to move forward as one.

Thank you.

end – ;(

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