God Particle: Existence to be Confirmed by 2012

The Christian Post – By Simon Saavedra

Physicists directing research through the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) have announced that the existence of the sub-atomic “God particle” will be decided by the end of 2012.

For many years, scientists have speculated the existence of the particle, also called the Higgs boson particle, but have not been able to provide any proof to corroborate the fact.

However, at the International Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics in Grenoble, France, this past weekend, researchers presented some curious data bleeps that could hint the existence of such a particle.

So far, the physicists stated that after conducting particle-smashing tests in the LHC, reaching speeds up to 99.99 percent of the speed of light, they were only able to determine the location the particle was not found, adding that with more tests and more data they would be able to determine whether the particle exists within 18 months.

If the particle was found to exist, then it would explain how all matter, including creatures, in the universe have come to have mass. Additionally, it would complete the puzzle for the Standard Model of physics that was first established in 1970, a theory that explains the Big Bang as well.

“This experiment is one of the most significant of this third millennium,” Dr. Karl W. Giberson of the BioLogos Foundation said earlier. He called the LHC experiment an “extraordinary event for Christian to contemplate” and said it might lead to further experiments that will one day answer some of man’s deep questions regarding the universe…

Higgs boson

The Higgs boson is often referred to as “the God particle” by the media, after the title of Leon Lederman‘s book, The God Particle: If the Universe Is the Answer, What Is the Question?Lederman initially wanted to call it the “goddamn particle,” but his editor would not let him.While use of this term may have contributed to increased media interest in particle physics and the Large Hadron Collider, many scientists dislike it, since it overstates the particle’s importance, not least since its discovery would still leave unanswered questions about the unification of QCD, the electroweak interaction and gravity, and the ultimate origin of the universe.In a renaming competition, a jury of physicists chose the name “the champagne bottle boson” as the best popular name.

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